The Ides of May and Lebanon’s no-change election

Beirut. Photo by Charbel Karam on Unsplash

The Lebanese legislative elections have been hard to predict. Technically, it should have all been so clear. Considering the country suffered a devastating economic collapse and the equally devastating and tragic 2020 Beirut port explosion, one might have thought that Lebanese voters would want to sweep away the political elite with a vengeance.

The Lebanese MPs running for re-election were overseers of one of the worst economic collapses in modern history.

Lebanon’s currency has lost 90 per cent its value and inflation is above 200 per cent.

Nearly a third of Lebanese are jobless.

Lebanon’s political elite, remember, are known for their self-dealing, self-absorption and self-preservation. Why would voters not want to sweep the whole lot away?

The problem is there isn’t enough of an organised opposition.

And the fact that voters are said to be both apathetic and cynical.

So Hezbollah is likely to emerge from election day as Lebanon’s most powerful political faction. And it would probably still take a sustained period of political deal-making for a government to be formed. And only after that could Lebanon even think of starting work on the political reforms demanded by the IMF in order for it to access the $3-billion rescue package.

An election that’s not a catalyst for change, then?

Yes, and no. The one striking change in this election is the number of young candidates and independents who ran.

Originally published at https://www.rashmee.com on May 14, 2022.

You might also like:

The world in four elections: the Ides of May and the Philippines

--

--

--

PhD. Journalism by trade & inclination. Sign up for free email updates on https://www.rashmee.com email me at rashmee@rashmee.com http://muckrack.com/rashmeerl

Love podcasts or audiobooks? Learn on the go with our new app.

Recommended from Medium

EFFECT OF CRIME IN THE NATION

Why We Must Name And Shame Rapists In Nigeria — Bunmi Dipo-Salami, JP

Examination and Student safety: a big issue for parents right now by Gopalan Anish Acharya

A dark narrative of violence runs alongside the shining India story

Do you remember…

Rwanda is leading the fightback against the insurgency in Mozambique.

Rwanda is leading the fightback against the insurgency in Mozambique.

If Anies baswedan becomes president, it will solve the flood and traffic jam?

An ‘international’ tribunal for ISIS fighters?

Get the Medium app

A button that says 'Download on the App Store', and if clicked it will lead you to the iOS App store
A button that says 'Get it on, Google Play', and if clicked it will lead you to the Google Play store
Rashmee Roshan Lall

Rashmee Roshan Lall

PhD. Journalism by trade & inclination. Sign up for free email updates on https://www.rashmee.com email me at rashmee@rashmee.com http://muckrack.com/rashmeerl

More from Medium

Our man in Kigali (and Gitega)

False: Video of public death penalty trial shows Myanmar, not China | annie lab

‘Stories Invincible’ initiative aims to elevate restorative narratives in Camden, New Jersey

Decoration only: White text reads “STORIES INVINCIBLE” against a black background with a yellow subheading that reads “Transformative narratives from the City of Camden.”

Digital society: The Power of the Individual